Synchronicity

 

woodborough12

 

… synchronicities are moments in time in which there is a fissure in the fabric of what we have taken for reality and there is a bleed through from a higher dimension outside of time. Synchronicities are expressions of the dreamlike nature of reality, as they are moments in time when the timeless, dreamlike nature of the universe shines forth its radiance and openly reveals itself to us, offering us an open doorway to lucidity.

 

— Paul Levy

 

 

What is humanity?
                somewhere inside
a torus
of crows

Question Dietmar Tauchner,  Answer Michelle Tennison (2017)

To See Rightly

Indigenous peoples who still live close to the earth experience life very differently than we do in the West; they seem to perceive things that we cannot see, things that they are surprised we do not perceive. The explanation for this is simple, but profound: when you ask them where in the body they live, they gesture to the region of their hearts, while modern Westerners typically point to their heads. Perhaps the great lyrical writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry had some insight into this phenomenon when he wrote, “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret. It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”

— Stephen Harrod Buhner

 

 

The Space of One

 

Everything leads one to believe that there exists a certain place in the mind (point de l’esprit) where life and death, reality and imagination, past and future, the communicable and the incommunicable, high and low will cease to be perceived in opposition.

 — Andre Breton,  Second Surrealist Manifesto

 

When does future begin?
          cicadas — everything that
          was never really river
          never really was

Question Dietmar Tauchner,  Answer Michelle Tennison  (2017) 

The Eyes and Ears of the Heart

Heart cognition … allows us to deeply experience the living soulfulness of the world, constantly reweaving us back into the fabric of life.

— Stephen Harrod Buhner*

 

We forget that the heart is also an organ of perception.

The mind loves to divide and categorize, to classify, stratify and judge, but the heart  is about unification. A heart-centered stance is central to the cosmology of cultures who live in communion with nature, and is integral to the gifts of shamanism, for example.*  The heart can open the way for us to recognize ourselves in the world around us. The space of the heart is the space of one, where all is connected, all is communicating, all is present.

 

Is there a tear in the fabric of duality?
                   The ears of a deer full with windsong

Question Michelle Tennison,  Answer Dietmar Tauchner  (2017)

 

*The Heart as an Organ of Perception, by Stephen Harrod Buhner, in the March/April 2006 issue of Spirituality and HealthYou can read it the whole article here:

http://www.wakeupanddream.me/2006/12/heart-as-organ-of-perception-tied-to.html

 

Turning Japanese

A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

— David Bohm

I’ve heard it said that when we label something we’ve already lost it. Our mind closes around the label, and in our rush to apprehend it, it escapes us. Perhaps we should reconsider such common assertions as “It is a tree,” and choose instead to say “It is called a tree” … or a “cat” … or even

“I am called Michelle.”  Recently during a brief (unsolicited) encounter with a psychic I was told that I am, or have been, a Japanese man.

How does the seed become the tree?
          Falling in and out of white

Question Harry Hudson,  Answer Michelle Tennison, (2004)

Dream Haiku for Kaneko Tohta

 

The following haiku is from a dream, copied down verbatim.  At the time I knew it was written in response to, and in honor of the work of Kaneko Tohta:

 

 

                    at what point 
                    during the A-bomb
                    did the cherry blossoms bloom

                                         now gone

 

How did the impact of Tohta’s poetry weave a way into my dreams?  His work was largely unknown in the west until the publication of a series of works translated from the Japanese by The Kon Nichi Translation Group,  (of which Richard Gilbert is a member).  The strikingly original imagery and often surreality of Tohta’s haiku cause them to linger in the consciousness long after reading.

I was struck by his unflinching, matter-of factness when addressing topics like the war and the unspeakably horrific Atomic bomb:

one dog two cats
we three finally
not A-bombed

 

This alongside his gift for transcendently sensitive imagery reflecting on man’s relationship to Nature makes Tohta’s work remarkable, moving, and deeply affecting:

we all flow, float away

                       the sea tide stays

 

The two haiku above are from Kaneko Tohta: Selected Haiku With Notes and Commentary, Part 2:  1961-2012, published by Red Moon Press in 2012.

 

Of note:

Scott Metz has written an exploration of Tohta’s blue sharks haiku, including numerous possible translations from a variety of sources, as well as a look at the unexpected role of surrealism in haiku. This R’r blog entry is well worth a second or even third read and can be found in the Roadrunner Haiku Journal  archives here:

https://roadrunnerhaikublog.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/kaneko-tohtas-blue-sharks/